Day 3: Mark’s Braai

My second brother is the meat guy: I’m sure most families have one. He could easily have a steak for breakfast, a shank for lunch, a roast for tea, pork belly for dinner and some crispy bacon right before bed. You wouldn’t believe it unless you saw it.

Naturally though, as any family would do faced with such raw innate talent, we wholeheartedly indulge him, setting out an entire day just for his obsession; cue “Mark’s Braai”.

He gladly does much of the work, getting up earlier to go out foraging for his favourite cuts at a far off butcher, while the rest of us eventually begin to set up back home; waiting in earnest for his victorious return and ceremonial barbecuing. By about noon, the fires going, salads are all but tossed, chairs wiped down, and the beers are chilling. After months of scarcity, we are always yearning for a good old Tusker. He settles into his Braai-master role as I keep everyone liquid.

Normally I stick to the beers, not once thinking about wine. I believe there’s a moment for everything, yes … even some where there should be no wine. On this occasion though, a Nederburg Chardonnay (South Africa) is opened for the ladies. It would be rude not to try some, I mean she’s open already. Pouring a small tasting glass I swirl her around and bring her to my nose. I pick up white peaches laced with cream and exquisite toast. I’m getting more and more pleased with my “rebellious” decision.

I drop the glass to my parting lips, having freed her from her glassy fortress to frolic unrestrained on my indulgent tongue. Taking my first sip, citrus acidity intimately wound around the clean fruit leaves my mouth filling refreshed and yearning for more. I’m impressed with the wine. That skillful oak confirms the precision of the wine making on the second try. Maybe I should taste a Nederburg every once and again.

Day 3 Tasting finished, I’m back to beers with succulent meat to chew on. Another great day at home…

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